Applying For Part A & Part B

Click on the video below to see how to apply for part a and part b to start your Medicare Benefits

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Apply For Part A And Part B
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Click on the link below to start applying for part a and part b

To apply for Medicare Part A and Part B, you can follow these steps:

 

Step1: Determine Eligibility

Make sure you are eligible for Medicare Part A and/or Part B. Most people become eligible when they turn 65, but you may also qualify due to certain disabilities or medical conditions.

Step2: Enrollment Period

Understand the enrollment periods for Medicare. The Initial Enrollment Period (IEP) for Medicare begins three months before your 65th birthday, includes the month you turn 65, and ends three months after the month you turn 65. If you miss your Initial Enrollment Period, you may have to wait for the General Enrollment Period, which occurs from January 1 to March 31 each year, with coverage starting on July 1.

Step3: Apply Online

You can apply for Medicare Part A and/or Part B online through the Social Security Administration (SSA) website. Visit the SSA's Medicare page and follow the instructions for applying. The online application is typically straightforward and allows you to apply for both Part A and Part B simultaneously.

Step4: Apply by Phone or In-Person

If you prefer, you can also apply for Medicare by calling the Social Security Administration at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) or by visiting your local Social Security office. A representative can assist you with the application process and answer any questions you may have.

Step5: Provide Required Information

When applying for Medicare, you will need to provide personal information such as your full name, date of birth, Social Security number, contact information, and details about your current healthcare coverage, if any.

Step6: Choose Coverage Start Date

Decide when you want your Medicare coverage to begin. In most cases, coverage will start on the first day of the month you turn 65, as long as you enroll during your Initial Enrollment Period. If you enroll later, your coverage start date may be delayed.

Step7: Apply by Phone or In-Person

If you prefer, you can also apply for Medicare by calling the Social Security Administration at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) or by visiting your local Social Security office. A representative can assist you with the application process and answer any questions you may have.

Step8: Provide Required Information

When applying for Medicare, you will need to provide personal information such as your full name, date of birth, Social Security number, contact information, and details about your current healthcare coverage, if any.

Step9: Choose Coverage Start Date

Decide when you want your Medicare coverage to begin. In most cases, coverage will start on the first day of the month you turn 65, as long as you enroll during your Initial Enrollment Period. If you enroll later, your coverage start date may be delayed.

Step10: Choose Coverage Start Date

Decide when you want your Medicare coverage to begin. In most cases, coverage will start on the first day of the month you turn 65, as long as you enroll during your Initial Enrollment Period. If you enroll later, your coverage start date may be delayed.

 

Step11: Wait for Confirmation

After you submit your application, you will receive confirmation from the Social Security Administration once your enrollment is processed. This confirmation will include details about your Medicare coverage, including your effective date.

It's important to apply for Medicare Part A and/or Part B during your Initial Enrollment Period to avoid potential late enrollment penalties and gaps in coverage. If you have any questions or need assistance with the application process, don't hesitate to reach out to the Social Security Administration or a Medicare representative for help.